reblogged 1 week ago / reblog
Apr
1258
tulipnight:

Resting In Your Smile by Phil~Koch on Flickr.
reblogged 1 week ago / reblog
Apr
1

Water tensions are the new normal, no matter where you live, and this is just the latest example of that.

~Peter Annin, author of “The Great Lakes Water Wars,” talks to Bloomberg about Milwaukee’s old buildings, which are sinking as groundwater rots their wooden supports.  (via carlfranzen)  
  #quotes  
reblogged 2 weeks ago / reblog
Apr
19
imickeyd:

Warm Inhalation by Posnov

imickeyd:

Warm Inhalation by Posnov

reblogged 2 weeks ago / reblog
Apr
4

rae2021:

Apostle Islands, Wisconsin

  #photos  
reblogged 2 weeks ago / reblog
Apr
19

For African-American children seeking a better future, no state looks worse than Wisconsin.

A new national report shows that children of color face enormous barriers to educational and financial achievement — with Wisconsin ranking last in the disparity between white children and their non-white peers.

White children growing up in Wisconsin ranked 10th among the states in an index measuring 12 key indicators at various stages of life, including home situation, educational skills and income.

But Wisconsin ranks 50th for black children, 37th for Asian children and 17th for Latino children, according to the study from the Annie E. Casey Foundation titled “Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children.”

Wisconsin ranks with Michigan and Mississippi for the worst record on African-American achievement.

While alarming, the findings in the new Casey report are not new. The Wisconsin Council on Children and Families’ Race to Equity report, directed by Erica Nelson, recently identified the same sort of racial divide in liberal Dane County, one of the wealthiest counties in the state.

The Casey report found that 70 percent of Wisconsin’s white children live in households with incomes above 200 percent of the poverty level, about $47,700 annually for a family of four. At the same time, only 20 percent of black children have that level of economic security.

For Latino and Native American kids in Wisconsin, about a third come from households above the 200 percent of the poverty level.

On higher education, white adults ages 25 to 29 in Wisconsin are three times as likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than their African-American or Latino peers.

And among middle school students, white kids are six times more likely to be proficient in 8th grade math than black students.

reblogged 2 weeks ago / reblog
Apr
3
jonthephotographer:

Madison Capital Early in the morning.
From 2011.

jonthephotographer:

Madison Capital Early in the morning.

From 2011.

reblogged 2 weeks ago / reblog
Apr
409
tulipnight:

Farmer’s Delight by Phil~Koch on Flickr.
  #photos  
reblogged 1 month ago / reblog
Feb
7
  #photos  
reblogged 1 month ago / reblog
Feb
5

beige-king:

February 21st, 2014
Winter in western Wisconsin

  #photos  
reblogged 1 month ago / reblog
Feb
3

jonnyfixedgear:

A few from todays snowshoe hike in Cliffside park.

  #photos